Summer Fun!

School is out, graduations are over, and there are big things happening in the Peoria area!  Summer is a good time for community actions and block parties and that’s exactly what is going to be happening!  Come August 5 at 5:00 in the evening, the entire East Bluff is coming together to do a peace walk and then celebrate the summer and a crime free area.  Join AmeriCorps with our friends from the East Bluff Community for the Night Out Against Crime!  There’s always delicious food and fun games along with lots of great people.  AmeriCorps is very excited to be helping for another year and can’t wait to have fun. 

But that’s not all that we have going on.  Ignite Peoria is also coming up in August at the Civic Center.  It’s an interactive art exhibit with visual arts, music, dance, theatre, and different unique arts.  We are very excited to go and see that and we invite you to come as well since general admission and parking is free for the event!  You can join us on August 9th for an entire day of fun!

(http://www.ignitepeoria.com/, http://artspartners.net/ignite-peoria/)

We have many new members starting a summer term and taking on a summer full of camp!  They will enjoy long days with many kids of all ages at a variety of different camps.  The members who are stationed at the Children’s Home will continue to find things to do all summer long while helping with the East Bluff Build It Up (formerly Taking Back Our Neighborhood), and will be visiting a few pre-schools for our literary projects.  Our project from last year where we teamed up with Youth Build has gotten back together and they are currently working on fixing up houses on Frye.  If you know of anyone in the East Bluff that may need some house work please contact Glen Oak Community Church about their In As Much program.

Of course, AmeriCorps would not be AmeriCorps if we did not start preparing for Keepsacks!  Keepsacks is our annual project where we gather fleece and hygiene items in order to make blankets and hygiene kits to deliver to the shelters in the area.  Did you know the average age of a homeless person in Illinois is 9 years old?  This fact breaks our hearts and so we do our very best to help take care of them while their family gets back on their feet.  Luckily, we have a surplus of hygiene supplies left over from our time in Washington to help make our kits but we will as always need donations for blankets. 

Enjoy the sun and stay cool!

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We’re Back!

After 6 months of hard work, we’ve officially closed the Washington Tornado Relief Center. It’s a bittersweet feeling; while we’re thrilled to see people back on their feet, we’ll also miss all the wonderful volunteers and neighbors we’ve met. There’s too much to say about this experience for one post, so for now I’ll stick to the facts:

1. The WTRC was open from November 18th, 2013- May 10th, 2014.

2. During those 6 months we had countless volunteers (and by “countless” I mean, “we’re still counting them!”) who logged over 5000 hours of service time.

3. There were days when we had over 100 people come to the store for help.

4. We worked with many local (and not-so-local) organizations to find, receive, coordinate, and give out thousands of donations.

5. We filled 3 stores at the Washington Plaza in Sunnyland, plus 4 or 5 warehouses, with donations.

6. People from as far away as North Carolina and New Jersey traveled to the WTRC to volunteer with us.

7. AmeriCorps St. Louis came to Washington immediately after the tornadoes to take over the phone/volunteer coordination for us–and they were fantastic!

8. The Salvation Army and Red Cross brought hot food and drinks to us so we could feed our volunteers (and ourselves!) for several days.  The Red Cross continued to bring us hot chocolate and coffee all through the record-breaking cold this winter.

9. There were lots of tears–at first, tears of sadness and shock; but then, tears of happiness and relief as people started to put their lives back together.

10. We celebrated 3 major holidays at the Center–Thanksgiving, Christmas, and Easter. They might be some of the most memorable -and meaningful- holidays we’ll ever celebrate.

 

So, the WTRC is closed.  We’re still helping to make sure the remaining donations (mostly water, perfect for the hot summer coming up) gets to those in need, but we’re no longer in Washington daily.  The people we met, the stories we heard, and the volunteers who gave so much to help those in need will always stay with us, though.  They’ve become a part of our program, a part of our community, and a part of our lives.  And we’ll always be grateful for the opportunity to be part of their story.  We’re sure, no matter what, they’ll stay Washington Strong!

 

 

.Washington AmeriCorps

Catching Up

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This was Store One for the first few weeks!

Things have been crazy here in Peoria… Well, Washington.  We have all of our members hard at work doing many different things.  We’re coming up on FIVE MONTHS since the tornado ripped through Washington, East Peoria, and Pekin, Illinois.  With the weather warming up, rebuilding and renovations have started and THIS is getting everyone’s spirits up.  But with how busy things have been, the blog has been a little bare.  Sorry about that!  So here, is a bit of a recap of events for Fostering Transitions, AmeriCorps.

November 17 was the day of the tornadoes.  Things were pure chaos for the weeks that followed.  People were desperate to find a place to stay, they were contacting insurance, and gathering their possessions that were still there.  We were setting up shelters, gathering donations, and getting them where they needed to go.  Within the first few days, AmeriCorps had taken over all donations and had a distribution set up in Sunnyland Plaza.  We had three stores there plus a few other warehouses to store everything that came in.  The Midwest is known (by disaster aid organizations) for our generosity and it definitely showed!  The three stores included the general store, an overflow area, and a strictly clothing store.

Today, nearly five months later, we still have two of the stores at Sunnyland Plaza and a warehouse or two.  The stores have changed so much in this time though!  We have gone from everything on pallets on the floor, to shelves, and an actual organized store!  Not only this but we now get fresh produce brought to us every Friday and we are able to provide that for those in need as well.  We really have come such a long way.  We have gotten so many clothes we don’t know what to do with all of them.  We’ve clothed those who needed it here locally and have sent clothes all over the world now to those in need.  Hopefully soon we will be out of the clothing business as it’s not needed as much anymore.  We still have our clothing store open and it is available for anyone. The general store has transitioned to a long term facility meaning that you have to have some sort of documentation to show that there was property damage.  For example, customers must have a FEMA acceptance letter, and insurance document, or a Red Cross card.  We serve about thirty families in a day and are still open four days a week.  Everything is completely volunteer run.  We have a few of our AmeriCorps members stationed out in Washington instead of other sites.  I for example am stationed at The Children’s Home normally but since the tornado, I go to the office to turn in time sheets and for meetings, and the rest of the time am in Washington. But other than our AmeriCorps members, everything else is done by pure volunteers from all over.  We have had girl scout and boy scout troops, Church groups, College groups, people from Washington, people from all over Central Illinois, and also from many other states.  We have had donations flood in from very giving high schools, churches, and other people.  We recently had 110 prom dresses delivered to us so that girls don’t have to worry about the HUNDREDS of dollars that prom costs.  Through this, we have met some really amazing people.  Although this all came from a tragedy, so much good has come from this!

We have celebrated many different things this year as AmeriCorps, such as MLK Day, Black History Month, Women’s History Month, HATCH, Child Abuse Awareness Month, Autism Awareness, Mayor Day, and many many others.  We have been recognized for our service by the city of Washington and in just a few days, we will be recognized for our service by the city of Peoria as well.  These are very big things for our program and we are all very proud of what we have done.  

Not only have we been in Washington and celebrating wonderful things, but we still have many members who are hard at work at after school programs around the city.  We have members who have finished half of their terms and are now in the home stretch of finishing up hours.  We have members at the Dream Center, Salvation Army, and Friendship House.  Because of our members involvement in these programs, we have children who’s lives are being changed by a positive influence that they may not have otherwise.  AmeriCorps is really an amazing program!

Not only is our program and all the members amazing but we have a few AMAZING leaders.  I would like to take a moment to talk about our Team Member Coach, Natalie.  Natalie is a full time employee at the Children’s Home meaning that she has A LOT of stuff to do on site.  But since the 18 of November, with the exception of maybe a week, and Sundays, Natalie has been in Washington EVERY SINGLE DAY.  On some days she is both at the office and then at the donation center.  She works from early in the morning to late into the evening every single day.  She has made so many connections with those in the community and has befriended those who come in.  She knows people by name and can always be the person to calm someone down.  She heads the volunteers and makes sure that everything is being done correctly.  She handles the stress and unfortunately the drama, very well.  Natalie has really made an impact in Washington and touched hundreds of lives.  Natalie has made me incredibly proud to be able to say that she’s my superviser.  She has always been an excellent role model to all of us but now, working in this setting with her, I can say that she definitely has made an impact on my life and has set the standard for the type of person I want to be.  

So, although we haven’t had much time to blog about what’s going on, we have been hard at work, getting lots of things done!   Hopefully, I will be able to keep you more updated as time goes on!

Have a wonderful Monday!

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Limestone cheerleaders brought a TON of donations. Thank you :]

 

Celebrating Black History Month

Why is February Black History Month?  

In 1926  Carter G. Woodson and the Association for the Study of Negro Life and History decided that the second week of February would be “Negro History Week”.  This was decided because of Abraham Lincoln and Fredrick Douglass’s birthdays.  In 1969, the Black United Students at Kent State University decided that it should be the entire month, prompting those students to propose it to the board and one year later, they celebrated Black History all month long. In 1976, Gerald Ford made it nationally recognized and urged everyone to “seize the opportunity to honor the too-often neglected accomplishments of black Americans in every area of endeavor throughout our history.”

So, now that it is February (although a few days late), we will be honoring some of the African Americans of our past that have done amazing things for America!  

The ABC’s of Black History Month

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A: Audre Lorde-Poet

Lorde was born in New York City to parents Fredrick and Linda who were from Barbados and Carriacou.  Audre was born Audrey but later dropped the Y due to the interest in the artistic semetry of e-endings.  Lorde wrote her first poem by the eighth grade.  While studying library science, she supported herself by working many different jobs including, factory worker, ghost writer, social worker, X-ray technician, medical clerk, and arts and crafts supervisor.  After moving out of Harlem, she began to explore her lesbian sexuality.
In 1954, she spent a year at the National University of Mexico which is deemed as a pivitol year for her.  She described it as a time of affirmation and renewal where she confirmed her identity on personal and artistic levels as a lesbian and a poet.  She returned to New York where she then went back to school, worked as a librarian, and was very active in the gay culture of Greenwich Villiage. Not only was she very active in the gay culture but she was an active feminist who in her work attacked underlying racism within feminism, describing it as unrecognized dependence on the patriarchy. She argued that, by denying difference in the category of women, white feminists merely passed on old systems of oppression and that, in so doing, they were preventing any real, lasting change. Her argument aligned white feminists with white male slave-masters, describing both as “agents of oppression” 

Evenutally, she earned her Master’s Degree in library science from Columbia University  She had two children, Elizabeth and Jonathon, but divorced their father in 1970.  She had other romantic partners for the remainder of her life, which came to an end on November 17, 1992.  She was in St. Croix and had died of liver cancer, although she had fought breast cancer for 14 years.  She was only 58.
In her own words, she was a” black, lesbian, mother, warrior, and poet.  In an African naming ceremony before her death, Lorde became Gambda Adisa, which means “Warrior: She Who Makes Her Meaning Known.”
Her Work

 B: Bayard Rustin
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Bayard Rustin was a leader in the social movement for civil rights, socialism, pacifism, non-violence, and gay rights.  He was born and raised in Pennsylvania but in 1936 he moved to Harlem where he made a living as a nightclub and stage singer.  He was a leading activist on the early 1947-1955 civil rights movement and helped initiate a 1947 Freedom Ride.  He helped organize the SOuthern Christian Leadership Conference to strengthen Dr. King’s leadership.  He promoted nonviolence and the practices of nonviolent resistance.  He learned this while he worked with Gandhi’s movement in India.  He was also the chief organizer of the 1963 March on Washington for Jobs and Freedom.  He also influenced young activists such as Tom Kahn and Stokely Carmichael in the organizations such as Congress on Racial Equality and the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee. 
Due to Rustin being a gay may and homosexuality being outlawed in some parts of the United States, he was arrested.  This was criticized by may of his fellow pacifists and civil rights leaders.  Many of his political opponents attacked him by calling him a  “pervert” or “immoral influence”.  In addition, his pre-1941 Communist Party affiliation when he was a young man was controversial. Due to these attacks his didn’t speak publicly too much.  He usually acted as an influential adviser to civil-rights leaders. In the 1970s, he became a public advocate on behalf of gay and lesbian causes.
On November 20, 2013, President Barack Obama posthumously awarded Rustin the Presidential Medal of Freedom.

 

Martin Luther King Jr Day

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Every year the AmeriCorps members and their fearless leaders attend the MLK Day Luncheon with hundreds of others.  There is always a phenomenal speaker who inspires and encourages those in attendance.  Afterwards there is a freedom march that many participate in, although, AmeriCorps does not partake.  Instead, we do a service project, usually at the Midwest Food Bank, which is where we went this year.  Three years ago, there were some issues with who was going to come and speak, last minute they brought in Michael Eric Dyson.  Dyson is a Professor of Sociology at Georgetown and is referred to as “a Princeton PhD and a child of the streets who takes pains never to separate the two” by Michael A Fletcher.  The year following him was none other than Condoleezza Rice who spoke of what her father and grandfather had taught her about how if you put your mind to something you could do it.  Just like Dr. King.  This year, they brought back Michael Eric Dyson.  

He ignored controversy and spoke about what Dr. King would think of everything that is going on with the United States.  He spoke of unemployment, the treatment of the poor, the LGBT community, the young, and women.  He spoke of politics and everything that the conservatives and liberals disagree on and how what matters is taking care of people.  He spoke on the war on drugs, Trayvon Martin, and racial profiling.  He touched on how we are quick to judge people for numerous reasons.  He spoke of how those who sag their pants may be hiding a body that is ravaged by the community that they live in.  He spoke on the music of this generation and how the language offends people but that the situations and the lives these artists sing/rap about don’t bother them.  He quoted Biggie Smalls, Jay-Z, Trey Songz, Marvin Gay, Barry White and countless others, using lyrics to connect the audience.  It involved everyone and helped them understand the points he was making.  He spoke of how women make less than what men do when doing the same jobs, about how we “love our mamas and hate our baby mama’s”, and how we should respect and love everyone no matter their race, gender, religion, sexual preference, or anything else that someone uses to define themselves.

He even went as far as to call people out.  The mayor, the city council, and the pastors, who at one point were not perfect and how they therefore can not judge people.  He told Peoria that we are the belt buckle of the Bible belt and that Jesus would be afraid to come here because he does not meet our standards of what Christianity is.  It was a much needed reality check for many of those in attendance.  He was very clear that no one is perfect and that we have a very long way to go but he did so in an inspirational way that mixed comedy and music with what he was speaking about.

After the luncheon, ten people went to the Midwest Food Bank.  After a brief video and tour, explaining everything that went on there, we sorted canned goods, labeling and re-boxing them.  We formed an assembly line and got to work, doing 2,036 cans of spaghetti sauce in under an hour.  All in all, it was a very successful and productive day while also bringing all of our AmeriCorps members together on such an important day.  Remember, MLK Day is not a day off, it’s a day on.  

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Getting Things Done

washington-tornado images

Devastation hit nearly a month ago in the Washington Area, a quick ten minutes from Peoria.  That Sunday we all knew we would be called into the office, but we had no idea what this would entail.  We had heard stories of AmeriCorps teams being part of the first responders to the Joplin and Moore Tornadoes in the past.  Would that be us?  Would be in the middle of the mess, picking up the pieces of people’s lives?  Could we handle that?  Our members are for the most part in schools, doing after school programs and tutoring.  We were not disaster relief specialists and honestly, I don’t think emotionally ready for what we could have been asked to do.  It was 8 AM Monday morning when members came in, current and past alike.  We were ready, up for the challenge.  We sorted everything we had in the basement that we could donate, hats, gloves,scarves, sleeping bags, hygiene items, and blankets.  Then… We waited.  We had to wait for the powers above us to give us the okay.  So we waited, ate some McDonald’s… and then waited some more.  We were almost disappointed!  We were supposed to be there!  Instead we were sitting in the office, eating McDonald’s, telling stories of how long we were without power, how windy it was, and how scared we all were for those who we knew who could have been effected.

Finally, we got the call.  We were going to Washington and setting up a donation center.  Not quite clean up, not quite right in the middle of it all, but the perfect spot for our loving and compassionate members who were in fact trained to take care of people.  We headed to Washington and started sorting.  We had tables and tables set up, Julie had helped take over for an exhausted Chamber of Commerce member who had be effected by the storm and was now in charge of donations, Natalie lead all of the sorting with some members, Andrew (an alum) photographed every bit of it, and Rebecca made phone calls.  We knew that this banquet center wouldn’t last long as a donation center.  We had trailer loads of things coming and there was no way that this could be what we needed it to be.  Two days later, we moved.  We went to an empty warehouse and filled the entire thing with shelves to put items on.  Three empty stores became Donation Centers, and that was only the beginning.

Now, nearly a month later, we are still going strong.  Three warehouses are filled to the ceilings with donations that are currently being sorted and then used to restock our shelves at Sunnyland Plaza.  AmeriCorps has completely taken over donations and will be there for the long run.  We were told to expect six months.  We never ever would have guessed that we would be there that long, holding victims hands as they pick up what they need, hugging them as they cry, and reassuring them that we are there for them and that this was all for them.  There have been some ups and downs and you’ll get that with anything like that.  But we have truly seen the best of people and have been so blessed to be able to be a part of this.

http://www.pjstar.com/article/20131211/NEWS/131219761

This is a newspaper article all about our donation center, and although no members, nor Natalie were interviewed, member Brenton is pictured.  For any information feel free to contact us here or on Facebook.

Fostering Transitions AmeriCorps (Facebook page)

AmeriCorps: Getting Things Done!